New City Hall

City Scheduled to Move in to New City Hall in Late October

The City is finishing renovations to the former PASCO building on Terex Road that it purchased for its new City Hall. Located at 1140 Terex Road the property spans 20 acres and the building is 33,000 s.f. The larger facility will allow for five community rooms, including a small auditorium, that will be available to the public.

Why a New Facility?


For years, City departments were scattered across the City, some in leased space, others in City-owned buildings. The physical distance between departments, as well as the cost of leased space, created operational and cost inefficiencies.

In 2013, to consolidate offices, the City temporarily relocated various departments into one leased location on Executive Parkway. Planning began to purchase or build a new facility that would be City-owned.

City Explores Building New Facility


When Council made finding a new location for City offices one of the top five priorities for the City Manager in 2014, the City looked at city-owned land as well as land that could be purchased to build a new City Hall.

Locations on Veterans Way were considered, but as certified park land, changing the use would require a vote of the people. The City also looked at Downtown Phase II, but it would not fit with the Comprehensive Plan's vision and would keep the property tax exempt. The City also considered properties on S. Oviatt and Ravenna Street, but after review, they did not suit the need.

City Explores Building New and Purchasing Land


When Council made finding a new location and building or purchase to relocate City offices in one location one of the top five priorities for the City Manager in 2014, the City looked at city-owned land as well as land that could be purchased to build a new City Hall.

Locations on Veterans Way were considered, but as certified park land, changing the use would require a vote of the people. The City also looked at Downtown Phase II, but it would not fit with the Comprehensive Plan's vision and would keep the property tax exempt. The City also considered properties on S. Oviatt and on Ravenna Street, but after review, they would not fit the need.

Click on image to enlarge.

CIty Hall Timeline Infographic

City Explores Building New and Purchasing Land


When Council made finding a new location and building or purchase to relocate City offices in one location one of the top five priorities for the City Manager in 2014, the City looked at city-owned land as well as land that could be purchased to build a new City Hall.

Locations on Veterans Way were considered, but as certified park land, changing the use would require a vote of the people. The City also looked at Downtown Phase II, but it would not fit with the Comprehensive Plan's vision and would keep the property tax exempt. The City also considered properties on S. Oviatt and on Ravenna Street, but after review, they would not fit the need.

Exterior Views

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5

Decision to Purchase PASCO Building


After an extensive search for land on which to build a new facility and buildings available for sale, the City determined that the PASCO headquarters building would be the best, most cost effective way to provide the City with the space it needed and much less cost than building new. New construction would cost up to $9 million plus the cost of land (approximately $1 million to $3 million) for a total cost of up to $12 million. 
 
The well-maintained building located on 20 acres has 33,000 square feet of space, 200 parking spaces, and is not surrounded by heavy residential areas. It has ample office space and parking for current and future needs. The cost to purchase the property was $3.5 million plus the original renovation estimate of $1.5 million. Together the estimated total was $5 million.

It made fiscal sense to purchase PASCO, which would provide not only space for city offices, but also had a lower level that could be turned into community rooms for the public.

Renovation Bids Come in Higher than Anticipated


The original bid for the renovations came in significantly higher than the engineer's estimate. The increase in the bids was due to a shortage of skilled trade labor and contractors booked with other jobs, which drove costs up significantly.  Hudson was not the only city in Ohio that experienced increases in bids during that period.  

Even with the significant increase bids for the renovations, the total cost of the property purchase and renovations totaled $6.3 million, approximately half the cost of the $12 million to build a new facility.

Cost Comparison - Build vs. Buy

  Land Cost Construction Cost Renovation Cost Size Amenities Total Cost
Build New 
Facility
$3 million (estimate) $6 - $9 million (estimate) N/A 19,000 sf Offices only $9-$12 million
Purchase/ Renovate PASCO $3.5 million (building + land) N/A $2.5 million 
$297,000 (additional 
items yet 
to be approved)
33,000 sf Offices, community
rooms, auditorium, 
200 space parking, 20 acres.
$6.3 million

Renovations


The bulk of the $2.5 million renovations include making the building ADA accessible as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act, including a ramp at the front entrance, as well as LED lighting, electrical work, a back-up generator, and renovating the lower level to create the community rooms for the public. The additional $297,000 is for additional modifications yet to be approved, such as a security system Wi-Fi for the building, battery backup for the systems, an audio/visual system with TVs and controls for the community and meeting rooms, and moving expenses.  

The City kept costs down by doing the signs and the computer wiring and installing the computer hardware in-house. The original estimate of $400,000 for furniture was eliminated by using the existing furniture in the new building.

Floor Plans / Illustrations